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Rosen Trevithick

About Rosen Trevithick

Rosen was born in Cornwall. She studied psychology at Oxford before moving back to the West Country.

Readers have downloaded over a quarter of a million copies of Rosen's books. Several titles have broken into the Amazon charts, including a number 1 humorous fiction bestseller.

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Praise for Rosen Trevithick

"Brilliant."
- The Independent
"This is a stunning novella: cleverly-constructed, well-paced - and very informative. I read it in a single session and felt as if I'd been pulled through an emotional mangle."
- B J Burton (Author)
"... a marvellously entertaining read and I recommend it."
- Damaskcat (Amazon Top 50 Reviewer)
"My Granny Writes Erotica is a laugh a minute story with a few moments that steal your breath! I really enjoyed it and if it ever appears on Paperback I will definitely be giving copies to my family to read."
- Rebbie Reviews (Amazon Reviewer)

My Granny Writes Erotica Official Website


How Not to Self-Publish Official Website


20.06.2013 16:29
Guardian Announces Series of Interviews...

Guardian Announces Series of Interviews Showcasing Indie Talent

Today, the Guardian announced that they will run a series of interviews with self-published authors.

This is not the first time the Guardian has pledged support for indie authors, but today's article suggests dissatisfaction with the results of previous attempts to showcase our talents.

Articles from the Guardian are often referenced in indie publishing circles. Most recently, mystery writer Daphne Coleridge started a KUF thread about the Guardian's article, Self-published ebook sales reach 20% of genre market, in which Andrew Franklin, the managing director of Profile Books, was quoted describing the self-publishing world as 'deeply corrupt'.

However, Franklin's comments do not seem typical of the Guardian's overall take on indie publishing.

In October, the Guardian published an article, Self-publishing sees massive growth. Polly Courtney, who returned to self-publishing last year after becoming disenchanted with traditional publisher, HarperCollins, was quoted in support of self-publishing. 'It feels as though the ground is shifting at the moment. It's quite liberating. Some sort of transition was overdue.'

It sounds as though Guardian are as confused and excited about the independent publishing boom as we are. So, let's tell them all about our most talented, most professional self-publishing champions, and win them over.

If you wish to nominate a self-published author, you can do so by following this link.

You can nominate your own books, but it does ask you to be transparent.

Suggestions to help indies make the most of this opportunity

1. If a book is not polished to a professional standard, do not nominate it.

We all have to start somewhere and for the less affluent, that means having to publish work that has not been professionally edited, at least at first. There is a place in the self-publishing world for experimental authors with low-budgets to test drive their work. However, submitting unpolished work to a national campaign designed to showcase indie talent, will do the industry no favours. Better to nominate an author who publishes polished work and let him or her champion for you.

2. Be honest if you have a personal relationship with the author.

Being an author's friend does not preclude you from being the author's fan, particularly when one of the great strengths of the indie community is the great potential for interaction between authors and readers. I have several friends I have made as a result of them first reading my books or vice versa.

However, if you want to nominate an author you know personally, please declare the friendship.

Whilst it is sincere to say, 'I'm this author's friend but my love for his/her books goes further', not declaring a personal relationship is fulfilling the kind of bad stereotype that we're striving against.

3. Don't nominate your own book under a different alias or the same book multiple times.

I realise that I am preaching to a very small minority here, but...

To get the most of this opportunity, we need the authors who make it into the interview series be the ones who deserve to be there. Trying to rig the voting process won't convince this national newspaper to support us in the future.

From administering the IBB awards, I know that the majority of indie authors are honest. However, I was able to detect a small number of people who nominated their own books four times (yes, webmasters can tell) and I've vowed never to promote those authors' books again.

I know how it feels to be passionate about writing and desperate for that big break, but please play nicely. We're all in the same boat.

4. Nominate authors who are proud to be indie.

Some authors embrace what it means to publish independently, whereas others see it as an embarrassing last resort. Self-published authors are not the dregs that traditionally published authors don't want. Many indie authors have chosen self-publishing for its many merits : creative control, competitive royalties etc.

That last thing we need is an author getting picked who's going to tell a national newspaper that they're only indie because they haven't found a big name to publish them yet. Likewise, we don't need somebody speaking for us who believes that he or she is the only shining star in a cesspit.

5. Do promote the opportunity.

The more people who know about this, the more chance that really terrific indies will get noticed. Spread the word.

+

4 comments

20/06/2013 20:38
Cecilia Peartree says...

Thanks for drawing our attention to this, Rosen - and for your very sensible advice. I've just nominated someone (not myself!).

20/06/2013 23:13
Rosen says...

That's terrific. I've just posted on KUF about this.

24/06/2013 18:19
Rosen says...

I hope you're all telling this to the Guardian.

24/06/2013 20:59
Rosen says...

There seems to have been a misunderstanding. When I said nominate 'here', the word 'here' was a hyperlink. Listing your nominations on my blog won't help the Guardian find your favourite indies.

Apologies about the confusion. I have changed the text to draw attention to the hyperlink.


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